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Jewellery that Becomes a Part of One’s Body by Knobbly Studio

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It has been a while since the last post I did here. And the reason for that is a good one: I was away on holidays, exploring Mexico with its jungle, beautiful textiles, cultural variety and traditions. I am not going to tell you much more about it here, but if you are interested, please visit my Road Patterns blog. And now I am back to reality and back to writing. And I would like to share with you yet another interesting story about a talented maker.

Today’s designer is from Israel, Gittit Szwarc, who creates amazing jewellery pieces under the name Knobbly Studio. Her jewellery creations are plain and simple, shaped to perfectly match human body. It seems like these pieces become a part of the wearer, they move together, and finally blend in…

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Enjoy these beautiful creations and learn more about the artist by visiting her website, Etsy shop, Instagram and Facebook page.

Here you can have a peak at artist’s ideas and everyday activities:

What do we need to know about you?

Knobbly Studio is an independent jewellery brand from Jaffa, Israel. All pieces are designed by Gittit Szwarc and handmade by silversmiths, right here in our studio.

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What are your daily inspirations? What motivates you?

I have a long background in dance, martial arts and movement, and so to me, the most fascinating aspect of jewellery or apparel is the way it interacts with the human form. When creating a new piece I ask myself, what will it look like to someone gazing at the wearer from an angle? How will it move when she moves? How does it relate to the natural lines of her face, neck, collarbone, torso?

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Describe your creative process. What is your favourite part of it?

All of my pieces start with a view of the human body and an idea about highlighting a part of it. My ideal wearer is someone who is active and who feels comfortable in her own skin; I try to respond to that by looking into the ergonomics of each piece of jewellery, designing it to feel like a second skin.

When turning an idea into a design, my guideline is to take away every element that can be taken away, leaving the streamlined essence of the piece, and not a single element more.

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How does your work space look like? Describe your typical day in it.

I share a studio with my friend, textile designer Lee Coren. We moved into this studio in the summer of 2014 – up till then we had both been working out of our apartments, but our businesses grew until they devoured every bit of personal space and we knew we had to move out!

The studio is in the Noga District in Jaffa, a curious mix of galleries, indie designer studios and garages. Ours used to be a garage – we still enjoy the absurdly high ceilings and unfinished concrete floor. It’s a large space and looking back, we were a bit reckless to take it then, but we soon grew to use every inch of it. My section now houses two silversmiths and my indispensable assistant who handles shipping.

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Your tips for fresh artists, designers and makers.

I think my business took flight when two factors converged – the first that I felt I was designing in my element, and the second, knowing that this vein also resonated with other people. It took two years to find a good path! Keep making and designing, but exercise your ability to discard, regroup, turn in a different direction.

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All the images used in this post belong to the artist.

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